Shatili village, which was built during 7-13 centuries, is one of the brilliant masterpieces of Georgian architecture. This village is scattered on the slopes of a rock hill and served both as residence and a fortress. For many centuries it served to defend northern passes in the Caucasus leading to Georgia (now restored).

The village is lined with closely built tower-houses, what shapes a solid and inaccessible fortress wall surrounding the whole village. Shatili is linked with the outer world by the only narrow road leading to Arghuni gorge. The architecture is based on terraces. The buildings are basically flat-roofed houses and towers. Here and there the village is lined by narrow stone stairs leading to the top between the buildings.

Shatili is very close to the border of Chechnya. In the early 19th century a large force of about 5000 Chechen and Dagestan warriors stormed Shatili, which was defended by only 50 Khevsurs. Today, the battles are long gone, and most villagers live in a newly built village next to the fortress. Village is linked with the outer world by the only narrow road leading to Arghuni gorge which is open only from June to October.